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S0002 Mimikatz

Mimikatz is a credential dumper capable of obtaining plaintext Windows account logins and passwords, along with many other features that make it useful for testing the security of networks. 1 2

Item Value
ID S0002
Associated Names
Type TOOL
Version 1.5
Created 31 May 2017
Last Modified 12 April 2022
Navigation Layer View In ATT&CK® Navigator

Techniques Used

Domain ID Name Use
enterprise T1134 Access Token Manipulation -
enterprise T1134.005 SID-History Injection Mimikatz‘s MISC::AddSid module can appended any SID or user/group account to a user’s SID-History. Mimikatz also utilizes SID-History Injection to expand the scope of other components such as generated Kerberos Golden Tickets and DCSync beyond a single domain.23
enterprise T1098 Account Manipulation The Mimikatz credential dumper has been extended to include Skeleton Key domain controller authentication bypass functionality. The LSADUMP::ChangeNTLM and LSADUMP::SetNTLM modules can also manipulate the password hash of an account without knowing the clear text value.26
enterprise T1547 Boot or Logon Autostart Execution -
enterprise T1547.005 Security Support Provider The Mimikatz credential dumper contains an implementation of an SSP.1
enterprise T1555 Credentials from Password Stores Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from the credential vault and DPAPI.18945
enterprise T1555.003 Credentials from Web Browsers Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from DPAPI.1894
enterprise T1555.004 Windows Credential Manager Mimikatz contains functionality to acquire credentials from the Windows Credential Manager.10
enterprise T1003 OS Credential Dumping -
enterprise T1003.001 LSASS Memory Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from the LSASS Memory.1894
enterprise T1003.002 Security Account Manager Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from the SAM table.1894
enterprise T1003.004 LSA Secrets Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from the LSA.1894
enterprise T1003.006 DCSync Mimikatz performs credential dumping to obtain account and password information useful in gaining access to additional systems and enterprise network resources. It contains functionality to acquire information about credentials in many ways, including from DCSync/NetSync.18945
enterprise T1207 Rogue Domain Controller Mimikatz’s LSADUMP::DCShadow module can be used to make AD updates by temporarily setting a computer to be a DC.12
enterprise T1558 Steal or Forge Kerberos Tickets -
enterprise T1558.001 Golden Ticket Mimikatz‘s kerberos module can create golden tickets.75
enterprise T1558.002 Silver Ticket Mimikatz‘s kerberos module can create silver tickets.7
enterprise T1552 Unsecured Credentials -
enterprise T1552.004 Private Keys Mimikatz‘s CRYPTO::Extract module can extract keys by interacting with Windows cryptographic application programming interface (API) functions.2
enterprise T1550 Use Alternate Authentication Material -
enterprise T1550.002 Pass the Hash Mimikatz‘s SEKURLSA::Pth module can impersonate a user, with only a password hash, to execute arbitrary commands.245
enterprise T1550.003 Pass the Ticket Mimikatz’s LSADUMP::DCSync and KERBEROS::PTT modules implement the three steps required to extract the krbtgt account hash and create/use Kerberos tickets.23114

Groups That Use This Software

ID Name References
G0035 Dragonfly 12
G0094 Kimsuky 1314
G0079 DarkHydrus 1516
G0045 menuPass 17
G0141 Gelsemium 18
G0016 APT29 192021
G0114 Chimera 2223
G0008 Carbanak 24
G0088 TEMP.Veles 25
G0107 Whitefly 26
G0003 Cleaver 27
G0034 Sandworm Team 28
G0087 APT39 29303132
G0006 APT1 33
G0050 APT32 343536
G0037 FIN6 37
G0116 Operation Wocao 38
G0004 Ke3chang 3940
G0010 Turla 4142
G0096 APT41 4344
G0069 MuddyWater 4546
G0119 Indrik Spider 47
G0059 Magic Hound 48
G0076 Thrip 49
G0131 Tonto Team 50
G0046 FIN7 51
G0049 OilRig 165248
G0093 GALLIUM 5354
G0082 APT38 55
G0108 Blue Mockingbird 56
G0060 BRONZE BUTLER 575859
G0007 APT28 60
G0064 APT33 61
G0135 BackdoorDiplomacy 62
G0080 Cobalt Group 636465
G0102 Wizard Spider 6667
G0027 Threat Group-3390 Threat Group-3390 has used a modified version of Mimikatz called Wrapikatz.6869707172
G0011 PittyTiger 73
G0077 Leafminer 74

References


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